Our research focuses on the processes of protein folding and misfolding and how these processes can lead to widespread aging-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Self-assembly of proteins seems to be a generic process but results in insoluble fibrillar structures that can be toxic to the cell but can also have unique material properties. Our aim is to dissect and influence these self-assembly processes using biophysical tools such as single molecule fluorescence, atomic force microscopy and sub-diffraction microscopy, in order to develop new strategies to counteract protein misfolding diseases.

To contact us:

Jan Bieschke Ph.D.

1 Brookings Drive

Brauer 2033

St. Louis MO, 63108

Office Phone: 314-935-7038

Lab Phone: 314-935-3959

Fax: 314-935-7448

Email: bieschke[at]wustl.edu

Age-Related Protein Misfolding

Laboratory of Jan Bieschke, Ph.D.

Center for Biological and Systems Engineering

Text Box: Lab News!
Kathrin Andrich receives Travel award to the The XIVth International Symposium on Amyloidosis! 

Sha Jin receives Travel award to the 58th Meeting of the Biophysical Society! 
Sha has been selected as a recipient of a 2014 Education Travel Award to present her abstract in San Francisco Feb. 15-19, 2014  

Kathrin Andrich is among the 12 finalists for the annual image contest  at the 58th Meeting of the Biophysical Society in San Francisco, Feb. 15-19, 2014 






























Kathrin Andrich (Protein Isolation, Aggregation, AFM Imaging, Image Processing)
Monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains isolated from Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis patients´ urine were reduced to separate immunoglobulin light chain dimers. Resulting monomers were incubated under acidic conditions to facilitate fibril formation. Sample was settled on Mica and observed using AFM. An amyloidogenic heart is patient´s main prognosis factor.

Huy Lam’s Project Wins Engineering World Health Design Challenge!
Huy’s project team designed a Biliblanket, a low-cost alternative to treating jaundice in newborns. The device uses electroluminescent materials to transmit light, eliminating the need for expensive fiber optics, and to supply a low-cost, reliable and safe treatment for jaundice in newborns, particularly in the developing world. 

See the full summary of the project

Age-Related Protein Misfolding

Laboratory of Jan Bieschke, Ph.D.

Center for Biological and Systems Engineering